ON ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING: LINA BO BARDI AND BEYOND

Lina Bo Bardi, Girafa Chair, 1987 IN SET

Lina had introduced me to a new fight against the tyranny of drawing in our profession, which for an aspiring architect was no small deal. Often enough Lina would question the role of drawing as the only, or the most accurate, representation of architecture, and she warned us about the optical distortions of Gaspard Monge’s geometrical projections. – Marcelo Ferraz

LOGGIA MERCATO NUOVO, FLORENCE, 1551

Giorgio Vasari, Detail: Cosimo I with Arch, Eng, Sculp, 1555-63 IN SET

Powerful thoughts grounded in natural philosophy, natural history, biblical exegesis, divinatory practices, alchemy, magic, astrology, and antiquarianism shaped thinking about stones. With regard to Mercato Nuovo, what is salient is that such an understanding of stone suggests that its use imbued the loggia with a qualitative sense of vibrancy. Theories of the formation of stones charged the loggia’s physical material with a potency common to both the formation of stones and organic creatures. – Lauren Jacobi

Eisenman, House II, 1968

Peter Eisenman, House II, 1968, DM 1802 IN SET

‘Drawing is a way of thinking. I can’t think or write ideas on a computer. I write and if you look at my desk, it’s full of paper. So to me drawing is a form of writing, and a form of reading what I write. I don’t see any difference. To me drawing is not making pretty things or making representations. It’s not representing anything; it is the incarnation of the thing.’ Context, site and construction are ignored, because Eisenman reduces architecture to a complex articulation of signs. – Stefano Corbo

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